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Andre Gooden has spent his whole life in Grand Cayman. In his lifetime, he’s watched his island develop from a rural, quiet island to a bustling tourist destination that’s visited by millions of people each year.

“It was a good experience because you got the best of both worlds: the simple island life and the fast-paced city life,” Andre said.

Growing up, Andre said he never knew how to answer the age-old question “what do you want to be when you grow up?” He went to school, did what he was supposed to do, and found jobs that helped make ends meet. Eventually, he ended up working as an engineer for one of the island’s telecom companies. He liked the job for the most part—he made good money and was good at the job.

However, those feelings of not really knowing what he wanted to do lingered. He felt his life was missing that inner peace. After seven years at the telecoms company, he decided it was time to do something new, so he quit his job determined to find his passion.

Andre began dabbling in light subsistence farming by growing an assortment of vegetables like carrots and cabbage in his yard. He liked working with his hands and the satisfaction of watching his crops grow. This was the “new” he’d been looking for—he’d found his peace.

After doing a little bit of internet searching, Andre invested more time and energy into his garden eventually turning it into a small farm. He knew he could turn it into a business and in only six months, after a lot of hard work and social media advertising, Charlito’s Greenhouse was born.

At first, Charlito’s Greenhouse was only able to provide produce to a few people at a time, but Andre wasn’t going to stop there. While he didn’t have nearly enough to supply stores, his crop quickly outgrew his space so he moved to West Bay to get more. With more space came more crops like broccoli, peppers, kale, and a variety of fruits (his favorite things to grow).

Over the next couple of years, Charlito’s Greenhouse grew and Andre diversified his crop selection. With new crops came new challenges and Andre realized he needed structures to grow and store new plants. Never one to back down from a challenge, he taught himself carpentry and built his own greenhouses. He found a natural talent in woodworking, and his work quickly gained attention.

Today, Andre’s custom carpentry is the most popular part of his business (it’s what attracted us to him!), and he spends most of his time building custom decks, greenhouses, garden beds, and sheds. While his first love will always be the farm, he says the carpentry gives him a sense of satisfaction different than that of the plants.

“Plants will do exactly what they’re supposed to do and you know exactly what you’ll get,” Andre said. “With the carpentry and woodwork you can create something no one has ever seen, something new...it comes from your own experiences.”

In many ways, Andre is changing the landscape of food production on Grand Cayman. When he came on the scene a few years ago, commercial farming in Grand Cayman was virtually non-existent and many locals hadn’t adopted their own farming practices. For years, Caymanians have relied on imports from South America or the United States for food, but Andre wants to change that.

Almost as soon as his business was blooming, Andre was in the local schools teaching children about farming. He teaches the basics, giving the kids a chance to dig in the dirt, plant their seeds, and watch the fruits of their labor grow. He hopes this will help kids realize just how easy farming on their island is and eventually help the island become less dependent on outside imports.

“It’s about showing people what we can do on our own,” Andre said.


If you’re interested in learning more about Andre and Charlito’s Greenhouse, you can visit him on Facebook or check out his Instagram.

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You know what’s awesome about Cayman? It's even beautiful when it rains. Most of the time, our rain comes and goes in quick spurts (lasting no more than an hour), but every once in a while, we get a day when the sun doesn’t seem to want to shine. For those days we’ve made a list of things you can do and ways you can enjoy a day in Cayman rain or shine!

Visit the Cinema at Camana Bay.

On a rainy day, there is nothing better than sitting in a dark theater eating a big tub of popcorn. As the only movie theater in Grand Cayman, a trip to the Camana Bay Cinema is a unique experience that features all the latest films, a packed concession menu, and comfortable seating. The state-of-the-art theater offers a cozy place to relax with the family out of the rain.

After the film, take a stroll through Camana Bay. Though the area is mostly outdoors, there are plenty of local shops to duck into such as 3 Girls and A Kiln, Forever Summer, and West Indies Wine Company. Stop by Books & Books to pick up some new reading material or board game for a night in at your condo. There are also plenty of restaurants to stop by for a snack or a full meal.



Experience the National Gallery

Stay dry and view some beautiful pieces of art at the National Gallery. This cultural hub features artists from all over the world, showcasing some truly stunning examples of visual art. From traditional Cayman artwork to internationally recognized masterpieces, the National Gallery is sure to amaze. You can easily spend a couple of hours moving from exhibit to exhibit, taking a moment to appreciate each brushstroke and sketched line. You can also check their calendar to see what fun events they have coming up for your family to enjoy.

Tour the Distillery

Have you ever wanted to see how your favorite spirits were made? At the Cayman Spirits Company Distillery Tour, you can! The 30-minute tour of the 5,000 square foot facility will give you a taste of how some of Grand Cayman’s favorite rums and vodkas are produced. The best part is you get to taste all of the results at the end of the tour. If you find one you like, you can bring it home for a nice drink on the beach later.

Have a Night In

The best part about staying at Christopher Columbus Condos (besides the views, of course!) is the fact that every unit has a fully stocked kitchen, television, and comfortable furniture making it the perfect place for a relaxing night in. Many of the condos come with fun board games you can enjoy. Head down to Foster’s to pick up the ingredients for a delicious home-cooked meal or order delivery pizza from Gino’s and then gather round for a movie. There’s no better way to spend an evening.

Pamper Yourself

Just because it’s dreary outside, doesn’t mean you have to be, too. Rainy days are the perfect days to focus on relaxing and getting in some self-care. Consider getting a massage, visiting a salon for a full mani-pedi, or get stretching at one of Grand Cayman’s yoga studios. If you’d rather stay in your condo, consider a homemade face mask you can make with simple kitchen ingredients like sugar, coffee, and honey. Let the face mask do its job while you kick back with a book and a cup of tea.

Try Some Place New

With so many restaurants to choose from on Grand Cayman, there’s bound to be one you haven’t tried yet. Here are some of our places to add to your list:

  • Yoshi: One of the only places to get authentic Japanese cuisine on Grand Cayman, you can’t miss Yoshi if you enjoy sushi, hibachi, or other Japanese favorites.
  • Boggy Sand Caribbean Kitchen: Located a short drive from Christopher Columbus Condos, Boggy Sand is the perfect place for breakfast, lunch, or dinner. Their diverse menu offers a variety of American favorites, comfort foods, and Cayman dishes. Whether you’re in the mood for fish, pizza, a burger or a salad, you’re sure to find something that suits your taste buds. They even have vegetarian options!
  • Every Bloomin’ Thing: If you’ve never attended a traditional afternoon tea service, this could be your chance. The EBT Tea Room features an assortment of teas, sandwiches, and homemade pastries and scones making it the perfect place for lunch. Despite being the spot for a traditional tea, EBT prides itself on being a casual dining experience anyone can enjoy.
A delicious plate at Yoshi.

Go to the Beach Anyways

We aren’t here to tell you how to live your life, so if you’re feeling the beach, go for it! Hey, you’ll already be wet so what’s a little rain anyway? As any mom would tell you, just make sure swimming conditions are safe and no lightning is present.

The Sun Will Come Out Tomorrow

There’s no need to put your vacation on hold because of a little rain. Grand Cayman offers so many activities for visitors it would be impossible not to find something to keep you having fun while staying dry. Just remember to take a look outside after the rain has passed to see if you can spot a rainbow. It makes for the perfect photo. 😉

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Central George Town is home to an abundance of fun shops, delicious restaurants, and breathtaking ocean views, but did you know George Town is also home to some unique and interesting historic sites? Next time you’re in town on a mission to shop ‘til you drop, take some time to see these amazing historic places!

Mr. Arthur’s Home and Print Shop

At 186 North Church Street, you’ll find a small home and print shop that now operates as a general store. This small, white shiplap shop could be missed if you don’t know what you’re looking for. The shop offers a glimpse at Grand Cayman’s historical architecture and is the perfect place to stop if you need some snacks and drinks while walking through town.

Built in the late 1800s, the store was originally Mr. Arthur’s Home and Print Shop, owned by Arthur Bodden and his family. Known for his spotless white shirt, cap and pipe, Arthur was the first wireless operator and weather specialist on Grand Cayman. The print shop across from his home operated for more than 50 years printing Cayman Islands Government stationary.


Fort George

If you've ever noticed the wooden hut on a tall pole in George Town, you might have wondered where it came from. It’s a unique sight to see while strolling the shops on Harbour Drive, but this small site has a lot of tales to tell.

The hut is actually what remains of Fort George. Fort George was built sometime around the 1790s as a means to protect the island. It’s not clear whether Fort George ever successfully warded off an attack, but it was manned by local militias for many years. Eventually, the site was mostly abandoned and the sand-bottomed fort became a play area for children at the neighboring school. During World War II, a lookout hut was added to a silk cotton tree and was used by watchmen to monitor for German U-boats that commonly patrolled the Caribbean. It was abandoned after the war.

When a developer began to demolish the dilapidated Fort George in 1972, locals dedicated to protecting Grand Cayman’s history protested by standing in front of the remaining structure and eventually saved it.

Now a National Trust protected site, a replica of the lookout house was constructed using pieces of the original that had crumbled over years with no upkeep; it is now one of the more prominent features of a stroll through town, and one passersby ask many questions about.

When you visit, you’ll want to check out the three-panel mural painted by local artist John Broad that depicts three events that represent the strong history of both Fort George and Grand Cayman: an attack by Spanish marauders, a U-boat bombing, and an Easter Regatta.



George Town Step Well

Perhaps one of the easiest sites to miss and most unique in downtown George Town is the George Town Step Well.

When you’re picking out a souvenir cap at Outlet Embroidery Shop in Bayshore Mall, make sure you look at your feet. Viewable through a pane of glass, the George Town Step Well is believed to be one of four freshwater wells recorded in Grand Cayman in the 1700s. The well likely served as the main water source for residents of Hog Sty Bay and ships that docked at the port. The well was discovered by developers in 2003 and was excavated by local archeologists who found remnants of 18th-century pottery, glass, and other treasures. You can even see some of these artifacts outside the shop. The Grand Cayman Water Authority also found the water at the bottom of the well was perfectly good to drink today!


Take a Walk Through Time

If you’re interested in learning more about the history and cultural background of Grand Cayman, these unique sites are must-sees, even if they’re hard to spot at first. Next time you’re wandering through George Town, make sure you take some time to take a trip back in time at these amazing sites.

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If you’ve ever enjoyed the beautiful flora and fauna around Christopher Columbus Condos, you have our gardener, Brian, to thank! Brian is dedicated to keeping CCC beautiful by maintaining our trees, flower beds, and hedges. You may recognize him if you've done any early morning walks on our beach; he checks in on our stretch every day, raking the sand to make sure it's in tip-top shape for visitors.

Originally from Jamaica, Brian moved to Grand Cayman two years ago to make a better life for himself and his family. He has worked at CCC for those two years and says his favorite part about coming to work is meeting the guests and feeling welcomed by his coworkers every day.

When he’s not working, Brian enjoys going to the beach (who can blame him?) and playing football. He recommends guests make a trip to Stingray City to see the beautiful ocean and amazing animals.

Next time you’re visiting, take a moment to appreciate Brian’s hard work while taking a stroll on our property!


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Ahoy mateys!

It’s almost time for one of our favorite events of the year: Pirates Week. This unique, fun-filled festival is coming back to Grand Cayman November 7-11, and we couldn’t be more excited! Get ready to experience a family-friendly tradition full of spectacle, delicious food, and the culture of the Cayman Islands.

What you need to know

Pirates Week is a 42-year tradition of the Cayman Islands that allows visitors to immerse themselves in a little history, a little pageantry, and a whole lot of culture and fun. The highlight of the week is when the pirates invade Pig Sty Bay, riding into George Town harbor on authentic pirate vessels in order to take hostages and cause chaos, all in the spirit of good ol’ piratey fun. The pirates celebrate their invasion with a colorful parade of ships and entertainers and a fireworks display.



Throughout the week, celebrate local Caymanian cuisine with more than 50 vendors serving favorite local dishes like jerk chicken and turtle soup. You can also take some time to peruse the shops of local artisans and collect some “booty” for your friends and family.

Events to attend

Pirates Week Happy Hour and Kick-Off Party, November 7

Start Pirates Week off right with a happy hour and beach bash. Local bands will be playing so you can dance the night away. You can wear your normal beach attire, or if you want to go all out, we're sure a faux parrot on your shoulder or an eye patch wouldn't be discouraged! ;) 

Food Festival, Every day

Starting November 8, enjoy Caymanian favorites at the Pirates Festival Food Festival. Dozens of vendors are ready to serve up the best grub, offering so many options that you (and your kiddos) are sure to find something you'll love.

Pirates Landing and Parade, November 9

The highlight of the week is the Pirates Landing on Pig Sty Bay. Before they land, marvel in street acts, acrobats, and other local performers who are sure to blow you away with their incredible talents. Then witness an event unlike any other as authentic pirate vessels drop local pirate gangs onshore to cause mischief and mayhem aplenty. A battle will ensue and who knows who will claim victory. After they invade, the buccaneers and locals alike will parade through the streets, ready to show off their exquisite floats, costumes, and theatrical performances. You won't want to miss a moment!

Turtle Release, November 10

To further celebrate the wonders Cayman has to offer, the Cayman Turtle Centre will release baby and rehabilitated turtles into the wild with the help of a few locals. This is a rare occasion few will get to witness in their lifetime. Since this program began in 1980, 30,000 turtles have been released. This year is set to be another celebration of one of Cayman's most-loved treasures.

Illumination Night Parade, November 11

Pirate Week ends with a bang with the nighttime spectacular Illumination parade. Dozens of floats decorated in thousands of lights starring acrobats, pirates, and other performers will travel the streets of George Town ready to impress.

Share Your Tips!

We are counting down the days until Pirates Week and hope you'll be with us to celebrate. If you've been to Pirates Week before, tell us all about your experience and leave some tips we may have forgotten in the comments below!

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If you’ve ever been to the Cayman Islands National Museum, you have seen the incredible exhibits and experienced the history of Cayman. Meet Brian Watler Jr, the man who is responsible for designing these amazing exhibits.

Brian Watler Jr. was born and raised in Cayman. His family has been living in Cayman for many generations spanning back to his great-great grandparents and beyond. Brian says his favorite thing about the island is the culture. When describing the culture, Brian stated, “We have a way of doing and saying things that is so unique. Every single district has its own ‘accent’; you can tell if someone grew up in North Side or George Town just by their accent. You can even tell if someone’s from Cayman Brac or Grand Cayman by their accent. For such a small island, the culture is extremely unique.” He has been able to turn his passion for the culture into a career working as a PR/Media and Design Specialist for the National Museum.

Brian describes the National Museum as the living connection to Cayman’s past. His view is that the museum allows current and future generations to experience the island’s unique cultural heritage. With a passion for both design and culture, Brian can think of no better fit for a career than the National Museum.

Brian’s journey with the National Museum began in 2015 when he interned for the museum to design their 25th Anniversary logo. They were so pleased with the design that they brought him on board to design the 25th Anniversary exhibition and publication. Since then, Brian has taken on his current role where he works to create press releases, update the museum’s social media and website, and other PR-related activities. However, his favorite part of the job is getting to use his design skills to create a cultural and historical experience for museum visitors. Brian says that while most people with a degree in graphic design get to design flyers and brochures, he gets to design exhibits!

Last year, the museum installed an exhibition titled, “Cayman Airways: Celebrating 50 Years of Our National Airline.” Designing this exhibition was extremely enjoyable for Brian. As a child, he always had dreams of becoming a pilot, and he still owns a collection of airplane models, a few of which are Cayman Airway custom-made models. Most of all, Brian enjoys the interactive nature of this exhibit. “What I really enjoy most about the exhibition is the exterior airplane fuselage—it’s as if you’re boarding the aircraft—then you enter the gallery and see this fascinating display of airplane models ‘flying’ in the case.” This exhibit gives an in-depth look into the history of Cayman aviation from its humble beginnings to now employing over 400 employees.

Not only does Brian design amazing exhibits for the museum, he also teaches Quadrille (Cayman’s traditional dance) to students at Edna M. Moyle Primary School. This is his second group that he has worked with to teach Quadrille. His first group of students won a Gold award at the National Children’s Festival of the Arts in 2012. In his free time, Brian is actively involved in helping out in his community and church. He loves to photograph the island and visit with the elders in his community to hear their stories. Brian’s passion for Cayman culture and his community is obvious. He is even going back to get his Master’s Degree in Marketing: Digital Marketing and Advertising since his work for the museum is so closely related to marketing.

With his passion and knowledge, we had to ask Brian what other activities were a must-do for Cayman visitors. He recommends Pedro St. James Castle, Queen Elizabeth II Botanic Park, Cayman Crystal Caves and Cayman Turtle Centre. He believes all of these institutions are vital to understanding Cayman culture.

The next time you are on island, make sure to stop by the National Museum and learn more about the culture of Cayman and see some of Brian’s work!

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Pizza is one of the ultimate crowd-pleasing meals, and when you’re visiting the island you will be spoiled for choice on where to enjoy your next slice. We busted out our foodie journals and tested several pizza places across the island to bring you these recommendations—it was a difficult job, but someone had to do it! :)

Cimboco

Best Salad to Go Along With Your Pizza

As soon as you walk in the doors of Cimboco, you’ll be warmly welcomed by delicious smells of crust being baked in their brick oven. In addition to crisp, Roman-style crusts, they also boast the best Caesar salad on the island, which is served in a chilled bowl and comes with the perfect crouton to lettuce ratio. Be careful, though—you just might be dreaming of Cimboco's for weeks to come! 

Recommendation: BBQ Jerk Chicken Pizza  

The Brooklyn

Top Post-Shopping Power Up 

A must-visit when you stop by Camana Bay to shop, The Brooklyn has a huge selection of specialty pizzas, like the nacho, the bacon double cheeseburger, the Hawaiian, and the chicken tikka, in addition to your standard build-your-own options. Their trendy decor is certainly Instagram-worthy, plus you can watch your pizza bake right before your eyes in their brick oven. They also have gluten-free crust available upon request.

Recommendation: The Fun Guy (featuring 3 different mushrooms and truffle oil)

Boggy Sand Caribbean Kitchen

Closest Pizza Fix

Located just a couple minutes down the road from CCC, you can get your pizza fix the very quickest at Boggy Sand. A TripAdvisor Certificate of Excellence winner, you’re certain to love their beautiful decor and cheery service in addition to some top-notch ‘za. Served on a pizza board with an olive oil-covered crust, these pizzas are definitely something to write home about.

Recommendation: Margherita (mozzarella and fresh basil)

Casanova Ristorante

Authentic Italian

For a wholly authentic Italian dining experience, enjoy your meal on the waterfront in Georgetown at Casanova. Really do it up and order a glass of wine or some Limoncello to go along with your delicious pizza—you won’t regret it!

Recommendation: Focaccina (Garlic and Rosemary)

Gino’s Pizzeria

Delivery Right To Your Condo

After a long day splashing in the ocean and sightseeing, you might be ready to kick back, relax in your condo, and have the pizza come to you. Gino’s Pizzeria will deliver their signature pizza, pastas, salads, and sandwiches right to your door at CCC in West Bay—all with no delivery fee!

Recommendation: Gino’s Classic (double pepperoni!)

XQ's

Pizza + Live Music

If you’re looking for some quality entertainment while you enjoy your next piping hot slice of pizza, XQ’s is your place! Every Thursday XQ’s is host to live music by Jeff Japal in their piano bar, and they have a huge TV where you can watch live sports or special events like UFC fights. Plus, they also deliver to West Bay. 

Recommendation: The Godfather (sausage, pepperoni, black olives, mushrooms, onions, smoked gouda, and tomatoes—oh my!)

Alfresco

Pizza Right on Seven Mile Beach

Soak in all the beautiful sights and sounds of Seven Mile Beach at Alfresco’s in West Bay. A quick drive from the condos, Alfresco’s is famous for their outdoor dining and local fare like turtle stew and oxtail, but we’re pretty big fans of their pizzas, too! Build your own pizza by choosing from premium toppings like calamari, Gorgonzola cheese, roasted garlic, and more, or keep it simple with a meat lovers or vegetarian pizza—and whole wheat crust is also available upon request.

Recommendation: Seafood pizza (smoked salmon, shrimp, and lobster)

Hungry Yet?

This just scratches the surface of some of the amazing pizza options you can find in Grand Cayman. Which pizza is your favorite—did we miss your go-to spot? Let us know where we should check out next in the comments below.

**And if you’re feeling like a familiar taste of home or have a picky kiddo with you, American staples like Pizza Hut and Dominos are also available for dine-in and delivery.
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Did you know that Grand Cayman is home to one of only a handful of bioluminescent bays in the world? Bioluminescence is a fancy name for “light-up” creatures like fireflies, glow worms, and jellyfish. In Cayman, tiny light-up creatures live in the waters off the north side of the island, a short boat ride away from Rum Point. We recently took an unforgettable tour of the bioluminescent bay led by Tom Watling, who helped us see these enchanting creatures up close.

Tom and Lisha Watling are the owners of Cayman Kayaks, who offer eco-friendly tours of the bioluminescent bay by double kayak or by boat. Cayman Kayak tours run only on moonless or low-light evenings so the experience with the bioluminescence can be as enjoyable as possible. The tours embark from Rum Point, and while it’s a bit of a drive from West Bay, it’s well worth the trip.

We took the boat tour of the bay, and the boat itself was almost as neat as the tour! Tom’s boat, Moonless Moments, might look like a regular catamaran at first glance, but it was custom designed with the touring experience and the utmost safety of the bioluminescence in mind. The boat is electric, which protects the organisms from harmful fuel emissions, and its walls are high and painted black to help block out nearby streetlights. Panels in the floor of the boat pop out, allowing tour goers to get up close and personal with the bioluminescence without swimming in the bay. Tom explained to us that everyday things like sunscreen, lotions, perfumes, and hair care products are harmful to the bioluminescence, so swimming in the bay is strongly discouraged and tour goers are advised to avoid or wash off any sunscreen or lotion beforehand.

As we entered the bay, Tom passed around a paddle to put in the water. When we looked over the side of the boat, suddenly the water surrounding the paddle lit up a bright blue. It was impressive and beautiful, and that was just the beginning of the light show. Once the boat stopped inside the bay, Tom popped out the panels in the boat’s floor, and we were able to play in the water and see the bioluminescence up close. With every swipe of my hand, dozens and dozens of little creatures lit up blue along my movements like fairy dust. Though small, the light provided by these creatures is mighty!

Tom and a friend kayak in the bioluminescent bay (Courtesy of Cayman Kayaks

Though the organisms in Cayman’s bioluminescent bay haven’t been studied officially, Tom told us that they are believed to be Pyrodinium Bahamense. Dr. Michael Latz of the Marine Institute in San Diego, California, toured the bay with Tom and noted that the organisms were very similar to those in another, extensively studied bay in Vieques, Puerto Rico—Mosquito Bay. Though he didn’t put the Cayman creatures under a microscope, he felt there were enough similarities to hypothesize that Cayman is also home to the Pyrodinium Bahamense.

In addition to the magic of the bioluminescence, getting to chat with Tom during the tour was a treat in itself. He told us that his parents first visited Cayman from Canada on their honeymoon in the 1980s and immediately fell head-over-heels for the island. It would be almost a year before they went back home at all! As a first-generation Caymanian, Tom is a strong advocate for protecting and conserving Cayman’s natural beauty. He recalls the first time he really noticed the bioluminescence, saying, “I was out on my back out on a dock looking up at the stars—the star gazing is great this side of the island. I went to shore and picked up a coconut and brought it to the end of the dock, threw it up in the air, and watched it splash. It didn’t splash as per usual, though—it glowed, sparkled, and because the end of the dock was in shallow waters, shoals of fish shot out from every direction of impact from the coconut hitting the surface. Phosphorescence! I thought to myself. Incredible!

When asked what it is about the bay that invokes such passion in him, Tom answered, “It’s the small things that makes the muscle behind my eyes tighten and my heart squeeze into tears of joy. That is what Cayman’s wildlife is all about to me—the knowledge of what you are looking at, and then getting up close to the tiny life structures and truly appreciating these life forms.”

A naturalist in every sense of the word, Tom shares his passion for nature with those on his tours. One of my favorite moments of the tour was when he stopped the boat and took the time to point out some of the constellations in the sky above, gently encouraging each of us to take a few moments, breathe in the ocean air, and be present in nature.

With Tom after our tour. 

Next time you visit the island, I highly recommend you book a tour of the bioluminescent bay—it will be an experience you won’t soon forget! And if you’re interested in helping keeping the bay happy and healthy for generations to come, you can read more about how you can support Tom and Lisha’s efforts here.


*Cover photo courtesy of Cayman Kayaks
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What is Caymanite?

I recently discovered that Cayman has it’s very own semi-precious rock, Caymanite! I’m so excited to share more about this indigenous rock, and how all of you that love Cayman as much as I do can find a piece of it to take home with you.

Caymanite is only found in the Cayman Islands, and local artisans use the rock to make beautiful jewelry and special gifts. According to Pure Art Gallery & Gifts, a whimsical gift shop on South Church Street, Caymanite can be found in the higher regions of both Grand Cayman and Cayman Brac.

In its natural form Caymanite looks like a slate-like rock and can come in earth tones of brown, grey, red and white. Layers of these colors throughout the rock help identify this unique commodity. When cut and polished for jewelry the colors and layers are brilliantly displayed.

You can find Caymanite jewelry at the Craft Market, National Museum Gift Shop and several shops in Georgetown, but my favorite place to shop for Caymanite is at Pure Art Gallery & Gifts. They have a massive collection of not only jewelry made from Caymanite but gifts, too, including crosses, business card holders, stingray figurines and more. And if you’d prefer to have a piece in its natural form, they have small rocks for sale at the shop, as well.

I picked up a beaded Caymanite bracelet from Pure Art on my last trip to the island. The earthy colors stack really well with other bracelets. I usually add a bright coral beaded bracelet to play off of the natural colors of the Caymanite and sometimes a small leather cuff to create a fun indie mix. What I love most about the bracelet, though, is that I feel a special connection to the islands when I’m wearing it. It truly is the most authentic reminder I have of my home-away-from-home.

bracelet on wrist in front of the ocean and pure art sign

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