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Central George Town is home to an abundance of fun shops, delicious restaurants, and breathtaking ocean views, but did you know George Town is also home to some unique and interesting historic sites? Next time you’re in town on a mission to shop ‘til you drop, take some time to see these amazing historic places!

Mr. Arthur’s Home and Print Shop

At 186 North Church Street, you’ll find a small home and print shop that now operates as a general store. This small, white shiplap shop could be missed if you don’t know what you’re looking for. The shop offers a glimpse at Grand Cayman’s historical architecture and is the perfect place to stop if you need some snacks and drinks while walking through town.

Built in the late 1800s, the store was originally Mr. Arthur’s Home and Print Shop, owned by Arthur Bodden and his family. Known for his spotless white shirt, cap and pipe, Arthur was the first wireless operator and weather specialist on Grand Cayman. The print shop across from his home operated for more than 50 years printing Cayman Islands Government stationary.


Fort George

If you've ever noticed the wooden hut on a tall pole in George Town, you might have wondered where it came from. It’s a unique sight to see while strolling the shops on Harbour Drive, but this small site has a lot of tales to tell.

The hut is actually what remains of Fort George. Fort George was built sometime around the 1790s as a means to protect the island. It’s not clear whether Fort George ever successfully warded off an attack, but it was manned by local militias for many years. Eventually, the site was mostly abandoned and the sand-bottomed fort became a play area for children at the neighboring school. During World War II, a lookout hut was added to a silk cotton tree and was used by watchmen to monitor for German U-boats that commonly patrolled the Caribbean. It was abandoned after the war.

When a developer began to demolish the dilapidated Fort George in 1972, locals dedicated to protecting Grand Cayman’s history protested by standing in front of the remaining structure and eventually saved it.

Now a National Trust protected site, a replica of the lookout house was constructed using pieces of the original that had crumbled over years with no upkeep; it is now one of the more prominent features of a stroll through town, and one passersby ask many questions about.

When you visit, you’ll want to check out the three-panel mural painted by local artist John Broad that depicts three events that represent the strong history of both Fort George and Grand Cayman: an attack by Spanish marauders, a U-boat bombing, and an Easter Regatta.



George Town Step Well

Perhaps one of the easiest sites to miss and most unique in downtown George Town is the George Town Step Well.

When you’re picking out a souvenir cap at Outlet Embroidery Shop in Bayshore Mall, make sure you look at your feet. Viewable through a pane of glass, the George Town Step Well is believed to be one of four freshwater wells recorded in Grand Cayman in the 1700s. The well likely served as the main water source for residents of Hog Sty Bay and ships that docked at the port. The well was discovered by developers in 2003 and was excavated by local archeologists who found remnants of 18th-century pottery, glass, and other treasures. You can even see some of these artifacts outside the shop. The Grand Cayman Water Authority also found the water at the bottom of the well was perfectly good to drink today!


Take a Walk Through Time

If you’re interested in learning more about the history and cultural background of Grand Cayman, these unique sites are must-sees, even if they’re hard to spot at first. Next time you’re wandering through George Town, make sure you take some time to take a trip back in time at these amazing sites.

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Ahoy mateys!

It’s almost time for one of our favorite events of the year: Pirates Week. This unique, fun-filled festival is coming back to Grand Cayman November 7-11, and we couldn’t be more excited! Get ready to experience a family-friendly tradition full of spectacle, delicious food, and the culture of the Cayman Islands.

What you need to know

Pirates Week is a 42-year tradition of the Cayman Islands that allows visitors to immerse themselves in a little history, a little pageantry, and a whole lot of culture and fun. The highlight of the week is when the pirates invade Pig Sty Bay, riding into George Town harbor on authentic pirate vessels in order to take hostages and cause chaos, all in the spirit of good ol’ piratey fun. The pirates celebrate their invasion with a colorful parade of ships and entertainers and a fireworks display.



Throughout the week, celebrate local Caymanian cuisine with more than 50 vendors serving favorite local dishes like jerk chicken and turtle soup. You can also take some time to peruse the shops of local artisans and collect some “booty” for your friends and family.

Events to attend

Pirates Week Happy Hour and Kick-Off Party, November 7

Start Pirates Week off right with a happy hour and beach bash. Local bands will be playing so you can dance the night away. You can wear your normal beach attire, or if you want to go all out, we're sure a faux parrot on your shoulder or an eye patch wouldn't be discouraged! ;) 

Food Festival, Every day

Starting November 8, enjoy Caymanian favorites at the Pirates Festival Food Festival. Dozens of vendors are ready to serve up the best grub, offering so many options that you (and your kiddos) are sure to find something you'll love.

Pirates Landing and Parade, November 9

The highlight of the week is the Pirates Landing on Pig Sty Bay. Before they land, marvel in street acts, acrobats, and other local performers who are sure to blow you away with their incredible talents. Then witness an event unlike any other as authentic pirate vessels drop local pirate gangs onshore to cause mischief and mayhem aplenty. A battle will ensue and who knows who will claim victory. After they invade, the buccaneers and locals alike will parade through the streets, ready to show off their exquisite floats, costumes, and theatrical performances. You won't want to miss a moment!

Turtle Release, November 10

To further celebrate the wonders Cayman has to offer, the Cayman Turtle Centre will release baby and rehabilitated turtles into the wild with the help of a few locals. This is a rare occasion few will get to witness in their lifetime. Since this program began in 1980, 30,000 turtles have been released. This year is set to be another celebration of one of Cayman's most-loved treasures.

Illumination Night Parade, November 11

Pirate Week ends with a bang with the nighttime spectacular Illumination parade. Dozens of floats decorated in thousands of lights starring acrobats, pirates, and other performers will travel the streets of George Town ready to impress.

Share Your Tips!

We are counting down the days until Pirates Week and hope you'll be with us to celebrate. If you've been to Pirates Week before, tell us all about your experience and leave some tips we may have forgotten in the comments below!

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If you’ve ever been to the Cayman Islands National Museum, you have seen the incredible exhibits and experienced the history of Cayman. Meet Brian Watler Jr, the man who is responsible for designing these amazing exhibits.

Brian Watler Jr. was born and raised in Cayman. His family has been living in Cayman for many generations spanning back to his great-great grandparents and beyond. Brian says his favorite thing about the island is the culture. When describing the culture, Brian stated, “We have a way of doing and saying things that is so unique. Every single district has its own ‘accent’; you can tell if someone grew up in North Side or George Town just by their accent. You can even tell if someone’s from Cayman Brac or Grand Cayman by their accent. For such a small island, the culture is extremely unique.” He has been able to turn his passion for the culture into a career working as a PR/Media and Design Specialist for the National Museum.

Brian describes the National Museum as the living connection to Cayman’s past. His view is that the museum allows current and future generations to experience the island’s unique cultural heritage. With a passion for both design and culture, Brian can think of no better fit for a career than the National Museum.

Brian’s journey with the National Museum began in 2015 when he interned for the museum to design their 25th Anniversary logo. They were so pleased with the design that they brought him on board to design the 25th Anniversary exhibition and publication. Since then, Brian has taken on his current role where he works to create press releases, update the museum’s social media and website, and other PR-related activities. However, his favorite part of the job is getting to use his design skills to create a cultural and historical experience for museum visitors. Brian says that while most people with a degree in graphic design get to design flyers and brochures, he gets to design exhibits!

Last year, the museum installed an exhibition titled, “Cayman Airways: Celebrating 50 Years of Our National Airline.” Designing this exhibition was extremely enjoyable for Brian. As a child, he always had dreams of becoming a pilot, and he still owns a collection of airplane models, a few of which are Cayman Airway custom-made models. Most of all, Brian enjoys the interactive nature of this exhibit. “What I really enjoy most about the exhibition is the exterior airplane fuselage—it’s as if you’re boarding the aircraft—then you enter the gallery and see this fascinating display of airplane models ‘flying’ in the case.” This exhibit gives an in-depth look into the history of Cayman aviation from its humble beginnings to now employing over 400 employees.

Not only does Brian design amazing exhibits for the museum, he also teaches Quadrille (Cayman’s traditional dance) to students at Edna M. Moyle Primary School. This is his second group that he has worked with to teach Quadrille. His first group of students won a Gold award at the National Children’s Festival of the Arts in 2012. In his free time, Brian is actively involved in helping out in his community and church. He loves to photograph the island and visit with the elders in his community to hear their stories. Brian’s passion for Cayman culture and his community is obvious. He is even going back to get his Master’s Degree in Marketing: Digital Marketing and Advertising since his work for the museum is so closely related to marketing.

With his passion and knowledge, we had to ask Brian what other activities were a must-do for Cayman visitors. He recommends Pedro St. James Castle, Queen Elizabeth II Botanic Park, Cayman Crystal Caves and Cayman Turtle Centre. He believes all of these institutions are vital to understanding Cayman culture.

The next time you are on island, make sure to stop by the National Museum and learn more about the culture of Cayman and see some of Brian’s work!

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Native Cayman dishes are an outstanding combination of island cuisine meets home-style cooking—deliciousness that you have to experience. Admittedly, it took a few trips for us to discover what dishes were unique to the island and where to find them. Once you sample the local food, though, you'll find yourself craving trips to Cayman not only for it's beauty, but also for dishes you can only get on island! Here are a few places you can "taste" Cayman culture for yourself.


  1. Champion House II

If you want to try local cuisine, Champion House II is a must-stop. The down-to-earth feel of the restaurant matches the seriously amazing home-style food. Sample Cayman-style fish, jerk chicken, turtle stew, conch stew, callaloo & ackee. Tip: Try several dishes by hitting up one of the daily buffets or best of all the Sunday brunch!


   

  2. Rankin's Jerk Centre

Grab some of the best jerk chicken on island at Rankin's Jerk Centre. Offering takeout and located in Bodden Town, this is the perfect pit stop for lunch or dinner on your way to or from the East End. It's also crazy affordable. Probably the least we've spent on a meal in Cayman!

     

  3. Boggy Sand Cafe

If you've got your heart set on Turtle Stew, we suggest a quick trip up the road to Boggy Sand Cafe. Just 1 kilometer from the condos and located right before Foster's, it's a convenient trip for which your taste buds will thank you.

     

  4. Vivine's Kitchen

Vivine's Kitchen is an island staple located on the East End. It's off the beaten path and as local as you can get, serving dishes such as salt beef & beans and Cayman-style fish. Enjoy dining in the tiny, unassuming interior or sit at a picnic table outside overlooking the sea. Hop on one of two resident hammocks after you chow down. Tip: It's cash only, so come prepared.

     

  5. Heritage Kitchen

Boasting "All Local Food," Heritage Kitchen is a great place for native seafood dishes and a chill island vibe. The Cayman-Style Grouper is absolutely delicious. So delicious, we went back twice in one trip for it! Also, don't miss the fish tea. (Hint: It's actually soup!) P.S. Heritage Kitchen is also cash only.

     

  6. Da Fish Shack

Da Fish Shack is a bit less "local-kitchen" than the other eateries on this list, but you don't want to miss their breadfruit dishes. Fried breadfruit and breadfruit pudding give yummy homage to the popular Cayman crop that's often compared to a potato in taste and consistency.

     

  7. Over the Edge Cafe

This North side restaurant and bar is ideal if your group is split on trying local fare. Some can indulge in tasty local cuisine like Cayman Style Lobster and a variety of turtle dishes, while others can get their burger and french fry fix. All entrees come with delectable Cayman fried bread (beignet fritters). 

For a huge Cayman feast, sign up for an island tour with Joe Tourist and ask him to take you by Over the Edge for the special Cayman platter you can only get on his tours. You won't regret it.

We hope you enjoy trying local dishes as these restaurants. Have any additional tips? Share them with us in the comments. And if you'd like to learn how to cook like a local check out the Traditional Cooking Classes that the National Trust has been sponsoring each month at the Mission House. The next class is July 6th, and they'll be teaching attendees how to make Custard-Top Cornbread. Yum!

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I was so excited when I first heard about the "Explorer Passport" created by the National Trust for the Cayman Islands.  I've been visiting Cayman for about 5 years, and was surprised to discover that I'd been to less than half of the places included in the passport. There are some points of interest that I hadn't even heard of which goes to show there is always something new to discover on this island.

The passport is an awesome activity booklet that the National Trust created to promote the cultural, historical and natural wonders of the island. It has 39 points of interest inside and comes with a poster-map and stickers to place on each location as you visit them.

The booklet describes the significance of each attraction and has extra tips for things to do, try or look for at each place. You'll find yourself eager to go to each spot so you can proudly put another sticker on your map. Kids will love the stickers and fun activities, and adults—you will love developing a deep sense of connection to the island as you learn more about what makes it so special; and who are we kidding, you will love the stickers, too!

The fun doesn't stop with the stickers and the map either. There are extra tips in the booklet which are presented as 3 things to check off at every place. The tips give even more reason to visit each attraction and made me want to revisit most of the places I had already been so I could experience something I missed the first time. For instance, one of the points of interest is Boggy Sand Road; the book explains that the street is lined with historic homes and the extra tips ask if you've seen:

  • Gingerbread fretwork (each district was known for its unique style)
  • Zinc roofs and expansive verandas
  • Traditional sand yards trimmed with conch shells

Although I've been to this sweet street before, I didn't know to look for these things that are culturally significant to the island. It made me want to go back and check off each item and read more about the traditional architecture in Cayman. 

The map even includes some culturally important places that few locals know about. While I was taking pictures of Miss Lassie's House, another place in the passport, a jogger approached on what seemed like her daily route. She saw me taking photos of the house and then saw the house. She stopped, pulled out her phone and took a couple of snapshots of the place saying she had never noticed it before. It's amazing what you miss when you're not looking for something.

There's so much joy in the "hunt," and taking your passport along on an island road-trip makes for easy exploring. A lot of the attractions are free and you can drive up to several of them anytime (even on Sundays when many island shops and attractions are closed).

So grab the passport and hit the road for some adventure. I suggest taking the day as it comes. Just pick a place on the map and go! Since some of the attractions are "off the beaten path" you'll discover a lot of things along the way, too. For instance, my husband and I found Dart Park by The National Trust—one of the stops on the map. At Dart Park you'll find super cool trees, an iron-shore full of fossils and little hermit crabs. It wasn't on the map, but we wouldn't have discovered it if we hadn't pulled in to see the Trust. We also happened upon a stretch of highway that followed the southern coastline just past Miss Lassie's House. Somehow in the five years I'd been frequenting Cayman we always bypassed that stretch of coastal highway and it was really pretty. I was so glad we found it.

Some of my favorite spots on the map have been Spotts Beach (for the sea turtles!), Crystal Caves and Heritage Beach. Honestly, I've enjoyed visiting them all, but I don't want to spoil any more of the fun for you.

Pick up your very own "Explorer Passport" at the National Trust and start discovering Cayman like never before. The packet only costs $10 KYD, and you'll have a blast checking off each location. Enjoy, and let us know when you've checked off all 39!

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If you’re looking to keep up your workout routine while in Cayman, want to jumpstart a relaxation habit you can take back home with you, or just want to try something new, there are a few fantastic yoga studios on island I would highly recommend. Bliss Living Yoga and Cayman Yoga Club offer a variety of classes seven days a week. Whether you’re a seasoned yogi or have never downward dogged in your life, there’s a class that will be fun, relaxing, and challenging for you.

Plan Your Class

You should look at the class descriptions on the studios' websites to see which type of class interests you the most. There are plenty of offerings each day of the week for all levels of yoga skill. The two studios are located between West Bay Road and Esterly Tibbets Highway, near Camana Bay, which is around a ten-minute drive from Christopher Columbus.

Both studios allow drop-in classes, so there's no need to call ahead—just arrive around fifteen minutes before class time so you can sign in at the front desk and get situated. If you don’t want to worry about packing a mat, you can borrow one for the class. A mat is complimentary for your first class, but you can also borrow one for a small fee for successive classes.

A single class is around $24 USD, but if you think you’ll come multiple times, a class pack might be a better deal. They’ll ask for just a few pieces of information and then you’ll be ready to get your yoga on.

What Should You Bring?

Wear comfy clothes you can freely move around in—t-shirts, tank tops, athletic or yoga pants are all great choices. Yoga is much easier to do barefoot, but you can wear socks if you would be more comfortable. You should also bring along a bottle of water, which you can bring into the studio with you, and a mat and towel if you want to bring your own. The studio will provide blocks, straps, blankets, bolsters, and other props you might need.

What To Expect

After you sign in, you’ll remove your shoes and store your belongings in cubbies—the yoga studio itself is a phone-free zone. Once you find a spot for your mat, you can start stretching or kick back and relax until class starts. Each class is lead by a trained instructor who will talk you through each pose as well as demonstrate proper technique.

I attended classes on two ends of the spectrum, one Flow class at Bliss Yoga Studio and one Power Vinyasa class at Cayman Yoga Club.

Flow

If you’re looking for a way to relax your muscles after a long flight, find some quiet time amid a busy itinerary, or just take your time with a workout, this is a great choice. The flow class is an hour long and focuses a lot on your breath, stretching and holding poses, and the meditative aspects of yoga. It’s accessible to all skill levels, from beginner to advanced. Many of the poses in this class were seated, and several props were used, which helped everyone modify poses to suit their flexibility.

My class was an early afternoon session with Janelle. She had a fantastically soothing demeanor and helped me relax my sore, plane-ride-agitated shoulders. I’d highly recommend this class to anyone, but especially for any first timers—you’ll get a good idea of what yoga is all about without getting into many difficult poses.

Power Vinyasa

Power Vinyasa is a rigorous class that focuses on working your whole body and the breath as you move from pose to pose. This hour-long course is designed to make you sweat and really challenge yourself. All skill levels are welcome and anyone can get a workout from this class, but I would recommend that you are already comfortable with flowing between poses (e.g., downward dog into the Warrior series) before attending this class.

Photo courtesy of Cayman Yoga Club

I attended a later evening class with Janine, who included some much-appreciated motivational wisdom within her instruction. She was also incredibly gracious and gave me some tips on improving a pose I struggle quite a bit with. If you're nervous about taking a class, don't worry, your instructor is happy to help and guide you—it's what they're there for! 

Get Started!

Don’t let vacation throw off your fitness resolutions this year. Stop in for a yoga class next time you’re on island, relax, and take that Cayman vibe back home with you! And don't forget you can also visit a traditional gym or take a bike ride around the island for other great ways to keep active while on the island. 

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If you’re like me, the only drawback to your trip to Grand Cayman is leaving furry family members at home. I’m not ashamed to admit that saying goodbye to my cats is cause for tears and daily requests for photos from the catsitter. Four-legged or not, my pets are important members of my household. If you have a big heart for animals like I do, you can show love to dogs and cats in need on the island through the Cayman Islands Humane Society.

The Cayman Islands Humane Society (CIHS) provides food, shelter, and care to homeless or abused dogs and cats, and also works to pair animals with loving and responsible owners. The shelter has a staff of 11, but can always use a helping hand from volunteers and support from donations. The current facility houses 37 dog kennels and a cat adoption room, which are kept very full due to the large number of animals in need.

How to help if you don’t live on island

  1. Volunteer to be a dog walker when you’re visiting
Dog walkers can come from 8 am to 5 pm on weekdays, though it’s best to walk in the early morning when it’s not too hot—paws and hot pavement don't mix. If you’ve got the time, staff will help pair you with a dog who likes to go for longer walks and socialize. Camana Bay and the beach are great places to get in a little exercise with your furry pal for the day!  
    2. Be a patron of the Thrift Shop and Book Loft
Proceeds from these shops support the shelter. Grab some beach reading or a unique souvenir and help feed a dog or cat in the process!
    3. Become an Associated Member for CI $40 a year
Memberships are a great way to not only support the work of CIHS but also keep updated with what’s happening at the shelter. Members receive a monthly newsletter with photos and updates. 
    4. Sponsor a cage for a puppy, kitten, dog, or cat for one year
These sponsorships are a great way to make a direct impact for an animal in need.
    5. Donate funds or supplies to the shelter
Monetary donations of any amount are always greatly appreciated and can be put to immediate use. Other donations such as food, treats, cat litter, etc., are also welcome—but you should give the shelter a call to see what they’re in the most need of before taking a trip to the store.
    6. Adopt a pet
The shelter does offer a service to fly a pet from the island, so if you fall in love with a particular fuzzy fellow you see on Facebook or meet while visiting, it is possible to bring them home. Dogs and cats are duty free when coming into the United States.
    7. Tell your friends! 
If you know any animal lovers who feel like Cayman is a home away from home, encourage them to support the Humane Society’s efforts as well. Share one of CIHS's Facebook posts or create your own. 
     

The Humane Society office is located at 153 North Sound Road in Georgetown near the airport, so it’s only a short ten minute drive from the condos. If you’re looking to brighten a sunny Cayman day even more by taking a dog for a walk or making a donation, get in touch with the Humane Society and volunteer!

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If rifling through ornaments and early present shopping haven't gotten you in the Christmas spirit yet, check out this year's Christmas Spectacular concert! The Cayman National Orchestra and Choir will present the evening's festivities on December 10 at 7:30 PM at the Harquail Theatre. The concert will also feature performances from the Cayman Youth Choir, The Stingrays acapella vocal group, vocal soloist Mikayla Corin, and a special guest, tenor Rory Baugh from Jamaica. 

You can purchase Christmas Spectacular tickets online here—the cost is $25 for adults and $10 for children. 

Founded fifteen years ago by Sue Horrocks, the Cayman National Orchestra is comprised of forty musicians from all walks of life. Horrocks not only serves as Executive Director and a flutist for the orchestra but she’s also the Musical Director of the Cayman National Choir. 

 violinistsWith the choir celebrating its fortieth anniversary this year, the orchestra is a relative newcomer to the Cayman arts scene but is quickly growing in popularity and demand beyond its “hidden gem” reputation. Musicians gather once a week to rehearse for their upcoming appearances. Their performance calendar is expanding to include special events like “Sounds of the Sea,” an outdoor concert at the Grand Old House in honor of Pirates Week that featured songs with a nautical theme. Tunes from films like Pirates of the Caribbean and scores by John Williams were big crowd hits as guests enjoyed the performance with dinner by the sea.  

Conductor Jonathan TaylorThe orchestra is currently under the direction of conductor Jonathan Taylor, who is looking forward to “presenting so much wonderful and eclectic, high-quality music to entertain our audience” at the Christmas Spectacular. ”I know they're going to love it!” Taylor comes to the orchestra by way of the United Kingdom and has found a home on the island—he says Cayman is “such a rich community of amazing people and musical opportunity.” 

Christmas music lovers are sure to rejoice as the Christmas Spectacular setlist has a little something for everyone. Tunes will range from classic titles like “White Christmas,” “I’ll be Home For Christmas,” and “Carol of the Bells” to upbeat numbers like “The Most Wonderful Time of the Year,” songs made popular by Pentatonix, as well as Broadway favorites, a bit of jazz, a bit of pop, and even a Renaissance chart or two. It’s certain to be a lively evening of good cheer, toe tapping, and crowd-pleasing performances that will send folks home humming tunes for days to come. 


If you miss the Christmas Spectacular, you can catch the orchestra’s carol concerts at the George Town Elmslie Church on December 12 and 14. To keep up with the orchestra’s upcoming performance schedule, be sure to follow them on Facebook
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Aside from the breathtaking scenery and the friendly people you meet on the island, one of my favorite parts of visiting Grand Cayman, is all the delicious food to choose from! There's the freshest seafood of course, authentic Italian, Mexican and so much more. You could dine out every night for a week and still not make a dent in all the food Cayman has to offer your willing taste buds.

What happens though, if don't want to go out for every meal or you're tired from a fun filled day on the beach? I say, take a trip to the grocery store first thing and when the time comes you can put that fully equipped kitchen in your condo to good use! 

While staying on the island there are great options to choose from when picking a grocery store. Even better, they are close to the condos! 

Here are the top 3 grocery stores I recommend stopping by to fill up your condo with quick snacks or ingredients to make a delicious meal for a night (or day) in.

1. Foster's Food Fair (Republix Plaza)

Foster's grocery store is your typical go to grocery store. They have a good selection of the food you're used to as well as food unique to the island, all at very affordable prices. This particular Foster's location also has a Priced Right  attached if you find yourself needing more than food. (Does anyone else forget to pack at least 1 thing when they go on a trip?) Priced Right is a warehouse shopping environment similar to Sam's Club or Costco.

Miles from Christopher Columbus Condos: 1 
Hours: 7am-11pm
*Closed on Sundays

2. Kirk Market 

I went to Kirk Market on my second trip to Cayman and was very impressed by the overall look, feel and selection. The store was so clean and organized, which I personally appreciate. Kirk Market's prices are a little bit higher than Foster's, so you'll want to keep that in mind when choosing which store to visit. 

Miles from Christopher Columbus Condos: 5
Hours: 7am-11pm
*Closed on Sundays





3. Hurley's 

If you happen to be in George Town and want to stop at a grocery store on your way back to CCC, Hurley's is a good option. Full disclaimer, Hurley's is the only store I haven't personally visited on this list however, from their website and Facebook page (and their motto) I can tell they are ALL about fresh food. Fresh produce, fresh seafood and freshly prepared entrees and sides ready to eat.

Miles from Christopher Columbus Condos: 8
Hours: 7am-11pm
*Closed on Sundays

Final tip: While you're at one of these stores keep your eyes peeled for the unique differences between the products and brands they carry on the island. It's fun to discover new treats and can be an educational trip if you have any kiddos in tow.

Happy Shopping (and eating)!

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The way I met LeTher Robinson was a bit unconventional, however in our brief interaction, she epitomized what it meant to be CaymanKind and I am so grateful. 

Earlier in the week I made a reservation to go underwater with Atlantis Submarines in Georgetown. When the day came for my dive, excitement was quickly replaced with extreme nervousness. I had just driven on the opposite side of the road (and car) for the very first time in my life just days before. To get to Atlantis, I had to drive on the opposite side of the road, by myself with only a screenshot of directions to Georgetown. That's right, no GPS!

Fast forward a bit and I finally made it to Georgetown, although I had missed the submarine's departure time. I was upset, thinking I had just spent money on a missed adventure and frazzled from having gotten lost in an area completely unfamiliar to me and not in my directions. If you're wondering how I eventually found my way all I can say is two words: divine intervention. 

Although I missed my ride in the submarine, I still wanted to find my way to the Atlantis to see if I could reserve a spot on their day dive the following day. As I began walking around I noticed a sign for the Sandon Feat Gallery and decided to go in and see if anyone inside could point me in the right direction. 

I was immediately greeted by two women (LeTher and her coworker) who were working in the gallery that day and told them my situation. I asked LeTher if she could look up some information for me on the gallery's computer. To be honest I was so stressed out at the time, that I wasn't thinking very clearly. So, when they simply suggested that I tell the workers and Atlantis my situation and see if I could reschedule it was like a weight-lifting lightbulb went off in my head. I know, that's one powerful lightbulb! ;) 

I found out that the Atlantis building was just a short walk down the road. With all that taken care of I began to look around the gallery while talking to LeTher. I found out that she is originally from Jamaica and has lived in Cayman for over 14 years. She and her husband have two kids, a son and a daughter. She went to Cosmetology school and even owned her own salon at one point! 

Today, LeTher is often hired for her interior decorating skills and specifically loves paintings. It's clear from these interests that she truly appreciates art and has a creative spirit! What better place to live than Cayman where there is so much beauty to be inspired by. Once I introduced myself as a member of the marketing team for Christopher Columbus she even began inquiring ways she could improve her own marketing skills. 

I'm so thankful to LeTher for her Cayman KINDness to me on a stressful day. It just goes to show you that little things you do for others can still make a big difference!
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